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Igbo People of Awka, Anambra State: #TeachMeTuesdays

Hello All!

I wanted to revisit a blog post that I wrote about the Igbo people of Awka, in Anambra state, Nigeria.  I am a descendant of Awka people, my dad is from Umubuele in Awka. Although Anambra is the english name, the original name is Oma Mbala. According to oral tradition, “Oma Mbala was the name of the ancient goddess whose river runs from the Uzo-uwa-ani underworld to Anam and Onicha axis, where it connects with Nkisi & Niger-kwora/Mgbakili Rivers in their journey to the Atlantic Ocean.” Oma Mbala region extends to parts of  these states in Nigeria – Edo, Delta, Imo, Rivers, Abia, Taraba, Benue, Niger, Nasarawa, Plateau, Akwa Ibom, and Cross Rivers States, as well as the countries Niger, Chad, Cameroon, Mali, and Central African Republic. According to oral tradition, it is said that the father of the Igbo’s, Eri – a sky God, settled in Anambra after being sent to the earth by Chukwu – Supreme God, after having traveled by water from what is now known as the middle east. He is said to have had 2 wives and founded Nri and Aguleri, two cities currently in Anambra state. Anambra state is part of 5 main states in Igboland – Abia, Anambra, Ebonyi, Enugu and Imo – and other states comprise of high numbers of Igbo people, such as Delta and Rivers states. It is said that Anambra is the wealthiest state in the southeast region of Nigeria. Anyway, I spoke about the Masquerades and Ekpe secret societies in Haiti and Cuba last week, and I just wanted to bring it back to the continent to regroup around Igbo culture in Nigeria, before continuing to America tomorrow. After we get to America, the Igbo revelations go continue o! I want you all to get ready for a complete story. Enjoy this blog post on the Igbo people of Awka, Anambra state! (All these pictures are pictures I took, and are of me and my family).

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CULTURAL AND ETHNIC GROUPS

Awka is the capital city in Anambra State in southeastern Nigeria, home of Igbo people. Before the 20th
century, the people of Awka were most famous for metal working and
their blacksmith skills throughout the region for making farming
implements, guns and tools. The Awka area in earlier times was the site
of the Nri Civilization that produced the earliest documented bronze
works in Sub-Saharan Africa around 800 AD.

Awka was governed by titled men known as Ozo and Ndichie who
were accomplished individuals in the community. Today, the tradition of
being a titled man still holds much importance. In typical Igbo
communities, people are not called or greeted by their names but rather
by their titles. Each title holds an important meaning. In Igbo land,
titles can be given through elaborate feasting and fulfilment of other
conditions. Historically, they held general meetings or “Izu Awka”
either at the residence of the oldest man (Otochal Awka) or at a place
designated by him. He was the Nne Uzu or master blacksmith, whether he
knew the trade or not, for the only master known to Awka people was the
master craftsman, the Nne Uzu. Overall, the average Igbo man by
tradition is expected to have a title, either given to him by his father
or one that he assumes and takes up himself.

Awka is currently divided into two local government areas; Awka
North and Awka South, with local representatives. However, it still
maintains traditional systems of governance with Ozo titled men often
consulted for village and community issues and a paramount cultural
ruler, the Eze Uzu who is elected by all Ozo titled men by rotation
amongst different villages to represent the city at state functions.

Awka comprises seven Igbo groups sharing common blood lineage
divided into two sections. Ifite Section, the senior section, comprises
four groups, Ayom-na-Okpala, Nkwelle, Amachalla, and Ifite-Oka followed
by Ezinator Section, which consists of three groups, Amikwo, Ezi-Oka and
Agulu. Each of these groups has a number of villages. All together,
Awka comprises 33 villages.

Awka people have always been and still are well travelled. In
earlier centuries, times demand for their skills as blacksmiths had Awka
people travelling throughout Nigeria making farming implements,
household tools, and guns. Each village had clearly defined trade
routes. For example, people from Umuogbu village plied their trade in
Benin and in the Urhobo and Itsekiri areas, people from Umubele (my
fathers land!) were stationed in the Igala areas in modern day Kogi
state, Umuike and Umuonaga in present day Abia and Rivers State,
Umuenechi in the Kwale and Isoko area of Delta state, and Umudiana,
Okperi, Ugwuogige stationed in Calabar area of today’s Cross Rivers
state.

The Imo-Oka festival is a week long festival of masquerades and
dances held in May at the beginning of the farming season in honor of a
female deity who it is hoped will make the land fertile and yield
boutiful crops. The festival starts with Awka natives visiting the
community of Umuokpu with masquerades and it ends with the visit of the
Imo-Oka stream on the final day which is heralded by a heavy rain that
falls in the late afternoon. There are four major events performed
during this festival.

Today, Awka people can be found all across the globe many
working as highly educated and skilled professionals in a wide range of
fields. As a result, there is a large Awka diaspora located primarily in
the U.K. and the U.S. There, they have formed social clubs like Awka
Union USA and Canada, Awka Town Social Community UK and Ireland, and
other community associations. These associations have been a positive
way for people to enjoy their culture as well as to engage in community
self-help projects.

Over the years Awka Town has attracted people from other states
in Nigeria and has a significant number of immigrants from northern
Nigeria, Delta and Enugu states, Cameroon and Ghana now comprising more
than 60% of residents in the town (http://naijasky.com/awka-south/114/people-of-awka/6416/).

World renown author, Chinua Achebe (author of ‘Things Fall
Apart’) says “Awka has a certain kind of aura about it, because it was
the place of the blacksmiths that created implements which made
agriculture possible.”

I’ve had fun educating you all on my people!

Remain Blessed loves ❤️.

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Igbo Marriage Tradition: #Throwback Black History Month Post…

Hello All! Let’s learn about the Igbo Marriage tradition on this fine Valentines Day. I took these pictures at my cousins traditional wedding in Nigeria in 2011. We do not need western traditions! I think it is interesting that non western cultures always have 2 ceremonies to validate their marriage, when our ancestors were perfectly fine with one, sophisticated ceremony. Quick fact: the white wedding dress became popular because of Queen Victoria, not because of tradition, it was a fashion statement. Every culture, especially we as Africans believed brighter colors in weddings showed one’s status in society, as you can see in the below pictures. The purity of the whiteness came from presenting a white sheet to the bride’s father to show her virginity, that never had anything to do with the dress. Even though that wasn’t Black history, that was important history, check out today’s Black History blog post below, originally written on May 17, 2016!

CULTURE TUESDAYS

 

Marriage
in Igboland is not just an affair between the future husband and wife but also
involves the parents, the extended family and villages. First the groom asks
his potential partner to marry him. Assuming that this is affirmative, the
groom will visit the bride’s residence accompanied by his father. The groom’s
father will introduce himself and his son and explain the purpose of his visit.The bride’s father welcomes the guests, invites his daughter to come and asks
her if she knows the groom. Her confirmation shows that she agrees with the
proposal. Then the bride’s price settlement (Ika-Akalika) starts with the groom
accompanied by his father and elders visiting the bride’s compound on another
evening.

They
bring wine and kola nuts with them, which are presented to the bride’s father.
After they have been served with a meal, the bride’s price is being negotiated
between the fathers. In most cases there is only a symbolic price to be paid
for the bride but in addition other prerequisites (kola nuts, goats, chicken,
wine, etc.) are listed as well. Usually it takes more than one evening before
the final bride’s price is settled, offering guests from both sides a glamorous
feast.

Another evening is spent for the
 payment of the bride’s price at the bride’s compound when the groom’s family
 hands over the money and other agreed prerequisites. The money and goods are
 counted, while relatives and friends are served drinks and food in the
 bride’s compound. After all is settled, the traditional wedding day is
 planned. The wedding day is again at the bride’s compound, where the guests
 welcome the couple and invite them in front of the families. First the bride
 goes around selling boiled eggs to the guests, showing to both families that
 she has the capability to open a shop and make money. Then, the bride’s
 father fills a wooden cup (Iko) with palm wine and passes it on to the girl
 while the groom finds a place between the guests. It is the custom for her to
 look for her husband while being distracted by the invitees. Only after she
 has found the groom, she offered the cup to him and he sipped the wine, the
 couple is married traditionally. During this ceremony, there is also the
 nuptial dance where the couple dances, while guests wish the newlyweds
 prosperity by throwing money around them or putting bills on their forehead.

Nowadays, church wedding follows
traditional marriage. During this ceremony, the bride’s train, made up of the
bride followed by her single female friends, enters the church dancing on the
music, while the guests bless the bride’s train by throwing money over the
bride and her entourage. The groom receives the bride at the altar for the
final church blessing by the priest. Sometimes, the traditional marriage is
combined with the reception that is then preceded by the church ceremony.

Be sure to click the link above to watch a video of a traditional Igbo wedding!

-Description taken from http://www.igboguide.org/HT-chapter11.htm

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Diasporans Making A Difference: Chigozie Obioma

DIASPORANS MAKING A DIFFERENCE

You all remember the book “Things Fall Apart” by Igbo man, Chinua Achebe? Well, meet the young Igbo man who they are calling the heir to Chinua Achebe! Author Chigozie Obioma, author of “Fishermen” is critically acclaimed all over the world! As the author of many other works, he wishes to build a portrait of Nigeria using words in novel, short story, and poetry form!

To find out more about his work and how you can support him by purchasing one of his books, click here:
http://www.chigozieobioma.com/author.html

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Ethnic & Cultural Groups: Awka People

CULTURAL AND ETHNIC GROUPS

Awka is the capital city in Anambra State in southeastern Nigeria, home of Igbo people. Before the 20th
century, the people of Awka were most famous for metal working and
their blacksmith skills throughout the region for making farming
implements, guns and tools. The Awka area in earlier times was the site
of the Nri Civilization that produced the earliest documented bronze
works in Sub-Saharan Africa around 800 AD.

Awka was governed by titled men known as Ozo and Ndichie who
were accomplished individuals in the community. Today, the tradition of
being a titled man still holds much importance. In typical Igbo
communities, people are not called or greeted by their names but rather
by their titles. Each title holds an important meaning. In Igbo land,
titles can be given through elaborate feasting and fulfilment of other
conditions. Historically, they held general meetings or “Izu Awka”
either at the residence of the oldest man (Otochal Awka) or at a place
designated by him. He was the Nne Uzu or master blacksmith, whether he
knew the trade or not, for the only master known to Awka people was the
master craftsman, the Nne Uzu. Overall, the average Igbo man by
tradition is expected to have a title, either given to him by his father
or one that he assumes and takes up himself.

Awka is currently divided into two local government areas; Awka
North and Awka South, with local representatives. However, it still
maintains traditional systems of governance with Ozo titled men often
consulted for village and community issues and a paramount cultural
ruler, the Eze Uzu who is elected by all Ozo titled men by rotation
amongst different villages to represent the city at state functions.

Awka comprises seven Igbo groups sharing common blood lineage
divided into two sections. Ifite Section, the senior section, comprises
four groups, Ayom-na-Okpala, Nkwelle, Amachalla, and Ifite-Oka followed
by Ezinator Section, which consists of three groups, Amikwo, Ezi-Oka and
Agulu. Each of these groups has a number of villages. All together,
Awka comprises 33 villages.

Awka people have always been and still are well travelled. In
earlier centuries, times demand for their skills as blacksmiths had Awka
people travelling throughout Nigeria making farming implements,
household tools, and guns. Each village had clearly defined trade
routes. For example, people from Umuogbu village plied their trade in
Benin and in the Urhobo and Itsekiri areas, people from Umubele (my
fathers land!) were stationed in the Igala areas in modern day Kogi
state, Umuike and Umuonaga in present day Abia and Rivers State,
Umuenechi in the Kwale and Isoko area of Delta state, and Umudiana,
Okperi, Ugwuogige stationed in Calabar area of today’s Cross Rivers
state.

The Imo-Oka festival is a week long festival of masquerades and
dances held in May at the beginning of the farming season in honor of a
female deity who it is hoped will make the land fertile and yield
boutiful crops. The festival starts with Awka natives visiting the
community of Umuokpu with masquerades and it ends with the visit of the
Imo-Oka stream on the final day which is heralded by a heavy rain that
falls in the late afternoon. There are four major events performed
during this festival.

Today, Awka people can be found all across the globe many
working as highly educated and skilled professionals in a wide range of
fields. As a result, there is a large Awka diaspora located primarily in
the U.K. and the U.S. There, they have formed social clubs like Awka
Union USA and Canada, Awka Town Social Community UK and Ireland, and
other community associations. These associations have been a positive
way for people to enjoy their culture as well as to engage in community
self-help projects.

Over the years Awka Town has attracted people from other states
in Nigeria and has a significant number of immigrants from northern
Nigeria, Delta and Enugu states, Cameroon and Ghana now comprising more
than 60% of residents in the town (http://naijasky.com/awka-south/114/people-of-awka/6416/).

World renown author, Chinua Achebe (author of ‘Things Fall
Apart’) says “Awka has a certain kind of aura about it, because it was
the place of the blacksmiths that created implements which made
agriculture possible.”

I’ve had fun educating you all on my people!

Remain Blessed loves ❤️.