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Character or Riches?, Character and Wealth, Yea That’s It… #TeachMeTuesdays

I have no problem with rich people. Whether you’re rich or poor, your character is what it is.

If that rich person has the heart to help and raise people out of poverty, not just to make minimum wage but live a good life, I have no problem with that rich person. Character trumps all, a lot of people want to put rich Black people in a bubble, if you want to hold them accountable, hold them accountable, but I don’t believe on turning your back on someone just because they became rich.

The problem is, Black people have been bamboozled for hundreds of years. People come and take our resources, lying and doing what else they need to do to deceive us into giving up what’s ours, and we’re left with nothing, or fighting for what’s left – even on our own continent. Greed and capitalism are ways of life that are foreign to us, but the system has told and deceived everyone into believing that it’s the superior way of life. Those of us who have adopted the style have abused it because a lot of times it is used to throw in other Black peoples faces that “look at me, if you want to be where I am then work”, however, that still is an issue of character. If someone works hard and earns their wealth an understands that they owe their community that same opportunity, then I’d say that’s what we need to be encouraging, not capitalism and competition. I watched my dad do it, he gained his wealth and gave, that is why I do not judge people or look for reasons to manipulate, because in my heart any wealth I gain will benefit my people and especially my children and great grandchildren will instill that into their generation.

Let us focus on character building. As a community, we have been bamboozled into thinking this fight is all about resources, but if we gain back the resources and no character, we will be fighting each other back into losing our resources. Divide and conquer is deep y’all: support black business, build character, pour the money back into our communities, and keep building and taking back what’s ours so we can rid ourselves of this disease called white inferiority – masked as “supremacy”.

Be well!

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#Throwback Black History Month Blog Post: SUSU

Hello All! Today’s Black History Month throwback blog post features a practice called SUSU! It is a tradition in which money is intentionally funded and spent within the black community, similar to a credit union, actually, it inspired the concept of the credit union. I was having a conversation yesterday, and the person was adamant that you have to have grown up poor to represent the poor; I disagreed, I said it was the mindset over income, you can be rich with a poor mindset, and poor with a rich mindset. If the mindset is to fund the dollars right back into corporations that don’t sow into the Black community, that’s a poor mindset, because it places value on infrastructures that don’t have our best interest. The key is our unified fight, If wealthy Black people share their resources and create spaces where “poor” can represent themselves, that is a solution too, but to argue over whether the rich or poor have an arm in this fight is useless. Decolonized minds that want to grow black communities all over the world are beneficial to the fight. Decolonize your mind, here. Enjoy!

CULTURE TUESDAYS

Susu

“In parts of West Africa and the Caribbean an ancient version of cooperative economics exists, called “susu.” As one of the oldest forms of microfinance in Africa, the practice is run by one of Africa’s oldest financial groups, susu collectors. They run their businesses from kiosks in the marketplace and act as mobile bankers.

Clients make low but regular deposits on a daily or weekly basis over the course of a month into a susu account. At the end of this period the susu collector returns the accumulated savings to the client but keeps one day’s savings as commission. Susu collectors may also provide advances to their clients or rotate the accumulated deposits of a group between individual members.

Today, susu collectors provide many West Africans who would otherwise be denied credit with access to money they need to start up small venture projects that in many cases benefit the community as a whole. In the United States, Black immigrants from the Caribbean have enjoyed one of the highest economic growth rates using a form of the susu and leveraging this practice to establish successful credit unions.”

Find out more here: http://itsoureconomy.us/2014/09/5-historic-examples-of-cooperative-economics-ujamaa-that-advanced-the-black-community/

Enjoy Loves! ❤️

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Culture Wednesdays: Susu

CULTURE TUESDAYS

Susu

“In parts of West Africa and the Caribbean an ancient version of cooperative economics exists, called “susu.” As one of the oldest forms of microfinance in Africa, the practice is run by one of Africa’s oldest financial groups, susu collectors. They run their businesses from kiosks in the marketplace and act as mobile bankers.

Clients make low but regular deposits on a daily or weekly basis over the course of a month into a susu account. At the end of this period the susu collector returns the accumulated savings to the client but keeps one day’s savings as commission. Susu collectors may also provide advances to their clients or rotate the accumulated deposits of a group between individual members.

Today, susu collectors provide many West Africans who would otherwise be denied credit with access to money they need to start up small venture projects that in many cases benefit the community as a whole. In the United States, Black immigrants from the Caribbean have enjoyed one of the highest economic growth rates using a form of the susu and leveraging this practice to establish successful credit unions.”

Find out more here: http://itsoureconomy.us/2014/09/5-historic-examples-of-cooperative-economics-ujamaa-that-advanced-the-black-community/

Enjoy Loves! ❤️