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Call Yourself the Right Name

What I notice is, people love to call their ancestors slaves but hate the idea of calling themselves African. Those slaves were enslaved Africans. How can one consider themselves a descendant of an African slave, but deny their Africanness?

I always say, if you take a Chinese person who has 2 children, one goes to live in another country and never returns, never talks to their parent again, but has children and grandchildren in their new land; that does not cut the blood ties, it only cuts the location. So many people have traced their habits/talents back to tribes in Africa. For example, I met a lady who was so into basket weaving. She stated that she did her DNA ancestry test, and she found out that the tribe in Africa she is from is known for basket weaving. There is noting wrong with acknowledging your roots. People are only ashamed to identify with Africa, because America teaches that African American history starts with slavery, no, Africans have a long history, part of it is slavery, but we were enslaved as victims, that is nothing to be ashamed of, but something to continue to fight against. We take no blame, although society likes to victim blame, we are not to be blamed for the repercussions of slavery, only to be blamed individually if we know better and don’t do better. But let’s not get it twisted, we have done better, extremely better, thrived throughout evil imposed circumstances, revolted at every chance – we never accepted our status as slaves, and have made major world accomplishments that are not credited to us – copyrights and patents stolen. We are so busy listening to narratives by people who are not us, mainly white people, that we forgot, they are paid to paint a negative picture of us, but would never paint that negative picture of themselves. They are so calculated that they framed rapists, murderers, and enslavers as “founding fathers”, and “revolutionaries”, if anything, that is something to be ashamed of. Instead, they want us to be ashamed of something that happened to us, and gaslight us into believing that being loyal to america, one of the countries that enslaved us, is patriotic. Never! I am patriotic to the nation that birthed me, that great nation is Africa, and it will never change. Africa is the reason I am resilient, the reason I am brown, the reason I have tight coily hair, the reason I have a place to call home always, and the reason that the entire earth has resources. Let’s not be fooled, every cell phone you hold is thanks to Africa and Africans. Therefore, being African is nothing to be ashamed of, but everything to celebrate. No matter the current status, we are still the only people in the world who shape every single institution with our ideas, energy, vernacular, style, and resilience. The world would simply not be without Black people, and I mean that.

Make sure you check out Melanated Gem™ empowering handmade jewelry! My African Ancestors gave me the idea and I am keeping it going, order today!

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Juneteenth is more than a day! It’s a lifestyle… & a surprise!!!!

Juneteenth, well, it’s a nice little combination between the words June and nineteenth, but what does it really mean?

You see, when slavery was abolished (not out of the kindness of America’s heart but to calm the rising storm of civil wars), there were reluctant states that did not want to end slavery, namely, TEXAS, also a couple of other states, but I would like to redirect the attention back to the enslaved Africans in this story.

First celebrated in Galveston, Texas; freed Africans held celebrations to commemorate the ending of slavery in June 19, 1865 (3 years after Abraham Lincolns emancipation proclamation), it is considered the “longest-running African-American holiday”. These celebrations were often held in churches, or near bodies of water, because even though we were physically “free”, we were still “prohibited” from using public facilities. It is Black people’s TRUE Independence Day, we don’t celebrate July 4th around here being that we were still enslaved while white Americans were fighting to be free from the British. We celebrate Juneteenth with educational events, barbecues, and use the time to reflect on where we’ve come from, strategizing where we’re going.

After a while, the holiday became more commercialized, and in Texas, became a paid reduced staff holiday. It used to be called Jubilee Day amongst other names, because it truly was a celebration of freedom. Black Texans raised their own money to purchase 10 acres of land to celebrate Juneteenth, that meant a lot to celebrate our own holiday on on own land. It soon gathered Black Texans from all over Texas. I often say that what used to be survival for us has now become commercialized and watered down. I say that about everything from Caribbean carnival to jerk Chicken to African spirituality. We’ve now commercialized it for tweets and likes and sponsorships. I would like to remind us all that we should get to the root of our traditions, not that we shouldn’t have fun, but we should never take it for granted. Everything we do should be to uplift our people, make sure we educate our communities, celebrate our holidays, and sell our products with joy and integrity, with authenticity.

I created the Juneteenth sale because I want to celebrate it with something the customers can take away with meaning. These Melanated Gem RBG Freedom sets were created for my audience (who mostly identify as Pan-Africans) but with an empowerment message, I pray you all receive the items with joy and truly understand your purpose and value. I created the Decolonize Your Mind courses to really help us break down the walls of colonialism in our mind body and spirit, and for individuals to walk away understanding their purpose. As you all know, DiasporAfri, LLC is for all Black people, the Global Black Diaspora, I like to highlight holidays and traditions that are meaningful to us, but I always remind us that the work is 365. I hope that the whole Global Black Diaspora can join along in celebrating Juneteenth as we begin to join our movements together.

Enjoy 20% off of Melanated Gem RBG Freedom Sets until 6/21, enjoy 50% off July Decolonize Your Mind Courses until 6/21 as well. I strive to provide service for the Global Black Diaspora with the upmost joy and integrity. Happy Juneteenth, everyone, we are FREE!!!!!!!

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Check Out DiasporAfri’s RBG Freedom Collection!

Hey Y’all! I am so excited to share with you all the Melanated Gem RBG Freedom Collection™️. Many of you know that the Pan-African colors of freedom are Red, Black, and Green. Many of you may know that Marcus Garvey is my hero, I have learned a lot from him, and I model some of my thoughts after him. He was the person I latched on to in graduate school when I was studying for my Master of Arts in Africana Studies, and I took a class on Pan-Africanism. Well, Marcus Garvey is the father of Pan-Africanism. Besides that, I have been studying my authentic audience, it was my goal to build an authentic audience using my authentic voice, and I found that the majority of my social media followers and supporters follow Pan-Africanism, and the majority of my supporters that actively support DiasporAfri are also Black Males, at least 90%! I also have lovely, strong, ladies that support DiasporAfri, LLC, and honestly, I love you all. I decided to dedicate this collection to my dedicated supporters, I thank all of you for your support over the years. This set represents freedom and unity, this set represents the Global Black Diaspora, and those dedicated to liberating us. We are Afrikans not because we were born in Africa, but Africa was born in us. Pan-Africans identify as African because we do not take on the title that was given to us brutally, we reclaim our original title. In the words of Marcus Garvey, “Africa for the Africans!”

  1. The Afrikan Man™️ Bracelet is for the melanated kings that continuously have shown love, supported, purchased, shared, and encouraged DiasporAfri, LLC. The word “King” is featured with Bronze Metal letters. The ends are tied twice and sewn several times for extra security.
  2. The Melanated Gem RBG Freedom Set™️ is for the ladies, it features the same items as the Melanated Bundle™️, with the Pan-African RBG colors. A handmade headband that is sewn and glued for extra security, and features the word “Afrikan” in gold acrylic letters. The bracelet features the RBG colors, and a pop of gold glass beads to make you sparkled like a gem, featuring the word “Gem” with Bronze Metal Letters (if you want the word “Afrikan”, the letters will be gold acrylic). The waist beads feature RBG colored stones and the words “Afrikan Gem” with Bronze Metal Letters. This is offered in a set only.
  3. The RBG Queen & King: Freedom set™️ is for the lovely Melanated couples! DiasporAfri is all about Black love and building strong Black families. This set comes with similar style bracelets; one catering to men, the other catering to ladies, with the words “Queen” and “King” respectively, with Bronze Metal letters.

Thank you all for your support! Be sure to check out the entire Melanated Gem™️collection by clicking here, see you soon!

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This Month in History: Igbo Landing in Georgia

And now we begin the Igbo story in the Americas, enjoy!

Igbo Landing is a historic site at Dunbar Creek on St. Simons Island, Glynn County, Georgia. It is where the Igbo people who had taken control of their slave ship refused to become captives of slavery in the United States. They took their lives in order to accomplish this resistance. This event marks a very important time in African American history as a strong symbol of resistance to slavery by Igbo people.

In May 1803 a ship arrived in the middle passage holding Africans that had been stolen from Igbo land; they were to be auctioned off at one of the slave markets in Savannah, Georgia. The ship included around 75 Igbo people from the bight of Biafra in West Africa. The Igbo were known for being fiercely independent and resistant to slavery.

During the journey, the Igbo slaves rose up in strength and took control of the ship, drowning their captors in the process causing the Monrovia ship to be grounded in Dunbar Creek at the site now known as Igbo Landing.

Floyd White, an elderly African-American interviewed in the 1930’s is recorded as saying:

“Heard about the Ibo’s Landing? That’s the place where they bring the Ibos
over in a slave ship and when they get here, they ain’t like it and so they all
start singing and they march right down in the river to march back to Africa,
but they ain’t able to get there. They gets drown”
.

The Gullah people, a people said to be descendants of Igbo’s, with many claiming their Igbo ancestry, live and dwell in Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina. They speak an Afro-Creole language and continue some Igbo customs as seen in their food and cultural traditions such as the Masquerade that I told you all about last week, deriving from Igbo culture and found in Caribbean cultures. I will talk more bout the Gullah Geechee next week, I just wanted to introduce the Igbo culture in the Americas, and not overfeed you! Here is an excerpt I found from a white woman describing the Gullah description of the Igbo experience. I mention white woman because as always, when they translate something, it may not always be the best, but I did like the excerpt enough to add it in my blog post…

“The West Africans upon their situation resolved to risk their
lives by walking home over the water rather than submit to the living death
that awaited them in American slavery. As the tale has it, the tribes people
disembark from the ship, and as a group, turned around and walked along the
water, traveling in the opposite direction from the arrival port. As they took
this march together, the West Africans joined in song. They are reported to
have sung a hymn in which the lyrics assert that the water spirits will take
them home. While versions of this story vary in nuance, all attest to the
courage in rebellion displayed by the enslaved Igbo.”

It’s important to know that, Igbo slaves, were most prone to be runaways. Why is it important? Because it shows strength, to resist evil and not succumb to the west and their divide and conquer tactics!

I find so much courage in this story. I thank my ancestors for their resistance….