Posted on Leave a comment

How Has Your Culture Shaped You? Ft. Dr. Talawa Adodo #TeamworkThursdays

In this “How Has Your Culture Shaped You?” interview, Dr. Talawa Adodo, Africologist and linguist talks about his Jamaican culture, Pan-Africanism, and how we should reframe our minds as Africans. I enjoyed his perspectives, and I am sure everyone will learn so many new things by listening to him so eloquently state his research and beliefs. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe! You can connect with Okunini Talawa on Academia.edu or at talawa.adodo@gmail.com. Connect with Ndidi Love at DiasporAfri.com to support, buy items, and read educational, uplifting content. Twitter: @EmpressAdaeze, @DiasporAfri_LLC Instagram: @Ndidi_Love SoundCloud: DiasporAfri_LLC YouTube: DiasporAfri, LLC Find more interviews done by Ndidi Love, here. Enjoy!

Posted on Leave a comment

How Has Your Culture Shaped You? Ft. Dr. Talawa Adodo #TeamworkThursdays

In this “How Has Your Culture Shaped You?” interview, Dr. Talawa Adodo, Africologist and linguist talks about his Jamaican culture, Pan-Africanism, and how we should reframe our minds as Africans. I enjoyed his perspectives, and I am sure everyone will learn so many new things by listening to him so eloquently state his research and beliefs. Be sure to like, comment, and subscribe! You can connect with Okunini Talawa on Academia.edu or at talawa.adodo@gmail.com. Connect with Ndidi Love at DiasporAfri.com to support, buy items, and read educational, uplifting content. Twitter: @EmpressAdaeze, @DiasporAfri_LLC Instagram: @Ndidi_Love SoundCloud: DiasporAfri_LLC YouTube: DiasporAfri, LLC Find more interviews done by Ndidi Love, here. Enjoy!

Posted on Leave a comment

Your Words Shape Your Destiny

family preparing food in the kitchen

Only you can tell you who you are. You are free, not colonized, you are a solution, not a problem, you are your ancestor’s accomplishment, not a failure. Speak it and don’t accept anything less my beloved Africana people.

I think the oppressors whose narratives have shaped this country are very aware of how words can shape reality. When they put out statistics on populations, they speak in the future, the unknown, and people use those words to determine their destinies. “By 2021, 25% of Black men will be imprisoned”, well, how do they know? Is it their plan? Is it their way of distracting? I just know that I hear Black people say, especially when discussing their goals or their children’s goals “I don’t want to be that statistic” or “I’m not raising him to be a statistic” – they live to do everything to avoid that statistic, instead of just living their calling. The one thing I hate is when parents say, “I’m just glad he has a job, not in jail”, is jail the benchmark? Why are we bringing jail into this? Is he a great debater who can be a successful lawyer? Is he great at building things and can be a great engineer? Is he a great artist that can be a designer? I believe living in the affirmative can help people achieve their goals way more, instead of avoiding things – the benchmark should be your goals. My dad spoke in the affirmative to me, he always told me what I’m good at and what I could be based on what I’m good at. You want to know why I’m so confident? Because my dad let me explore all my talents and made sure I knew my goals were valid. He said, “you want to be a teacher? just own the school”. I wasn’t raised to not be something; I was raised to be something.

I know that no matter what, racism is there, and that no matter what I achieve, racists will be racists in a country built on racism. I am not saying that achieving your goals will eliminate racism. I am saying that keeping ourselves and our goals as the focus, not damaging narratives from a people that has historically misrepresented us, will put us in better positions to make change amongst ourselves and our communities. I am not successful to avoid jail because an oppressive statistic said my people end up in jail. I am successful because I achieve the ideas in my head and don’t worry about any other narratives. I took statistics in undergrad and grad, trust me, I don’t believe in statistics the way that others do, I know they are used to shape narratives and instill fear in many cases. In my career, statistics have been used to damage the esteem of students that I have worked with and had to defend. Example: I had a job teaching literacy to students, the corporation had a goal, and benchmarks. When the goal of students enrolled wasn’t achieved, they changed the rules. I had students that were past their grade level, but we were told that they should stay in the program anyway because “they can use help anyway” based on the population they were in that is “low-income” Black community. However, the program was for students who were struggling, and all the students knew that. When a student entered that room, it meant they couldn’t read pretty much, and other students would laugh at that. I fought it and eventually chose my morals over damaging a student’s esteem to help a company achieve a goal. Manipulating a child to make them believe they have an issue when they don’t just wasn’t on my list of things to do. I had students that would enter the program, surpass all benchmarks and still were told they needed the program. Then the company put out statistics to say they helped all these low-income students achieve their goals when in reality, a fraction of those students actually needed help. You see how the numbers game works? It’s all tied to money. “If I can make these low-income people believe that they have a problem, I can make money by solving the problem”, is essentially the model of these “statistics” that they put out.

The power of words is critical. Define yourself, lessen the noise. Challenge every teacher that tries to label your child. I was the only Black student in my kindergarten class where they tried to label me, and my dad fought it – and won. In my career I have watched parents be taken advantage of, knowing well their kids had no problem, and the parents who fight, win. I don’t care what your teacher or your family told you, those ideas in you are valid. If you have an idea it came to you for a reason. Plan out the execution of that, tell yourself you are going to do it, and be part of the statistic that says “you will achieve your goals”. It really is that easy friends.

Amen.

Join me for the Dear Black People series where I teach people strategies to achieve this very thing. You receive years’ worth of research, references, personal follow up, and password access to zoom course upon completion, you don’t want to miss it! Check out details and register here, or below.

Posted on 2 Comments

Words are Loud, Actions are Louder

a close up shot of a man thinking with his fingers on his head

Don’t listen to people who always tell you what not to do, listen to the people who show you what to do….

There are teachers, and there are people who have opinions. Complaining isn’t wrong, but there are professional complainers. I know you’ve heard “there are people who have problems for every solution”, and that’s true. Living by example has always been the best way, and in the times of actual need, watching what those people actually do. I can say I’m solid, and I speak to people from a place of actual doing. Understanding the problem is necessary, and it is ok to complain about something that affects you or your community, but there are people who will always point out the problem with no solution for a better way. They will also reject any solutions, not even having tried any solutions themselves. I find that when I give examples of solutions, professional complainers will complain that the examples will not work, until I say it worked for me on a micro level, then they will say “that’s you, we need everyone to be like that”, Instead of saying, “I’ll try that”, they deflect to say the whole population needs it, dismissing that individual efforts make collective efforts stronger.

Telling people what not to do is not useful unless you tell them what to do. Example: a baby always hears no, but never given redirection, that baby will continue to do what they know, because they have no other way. The difference between teachers/leaders, and people who are just well-informed is in the actions. Actions will always prove to be more beneficial in leading people on the right path. Whether a person is silent or loud, strong or timid, their actions are what determine their character. I find that a lot of people have just the right amount of language to sound good, but they’re not really saying anything. I’m not trying to take away anybody’s voice, I’m just saying, if you want to know who to watch, watch those that give you a solution to work with.

Especially when it comes to beliefs and religions, there is no amount of talking and teaching that will change someone’s spirit, people have to try things for themselves. Again, people have to try for themselves, which is why I don’t believe in 1 leader, especially in a church setting, or mosque setting, or in movements. We must empower each other to do the right thing, and allow people the option to choose. Again, talk about your experiences. A lot of people talk from experiences they never had, but that leads to lack of accountability. When a person gives their own account, it increases accountability even for those who are listening, otherwise a bunch of non-experienced people are conversing about something they have never tried. We need more people to actually hold themselves accountable to the work, so that it can inspire others to do so.

I have done the work and have created a class that helps people decolonize their minds from the thinking that has hindered us. This journey took 10 years, and I created a step-by-step process that will allow people to shorten the time. I talk about every aspect of my mind that was transformed, and how that leads to the path of peace, and creating unity amongst one another as Black people, to make change. Join me! Check out the details here, or by clicking below, thank you.